Photography

The prescious decay of an abandonded Orient Express train

By on 9th March 2017

The Orient Express once was the most luxurious way of travel between countries in Europe. From 1883 till 2009 the passenger train service rode between Paris and Istanbul. Now only a few trains are left. One of them stands dormant in Belgium and hasn’t been touched since its last voyage. That was until Rotterdam-based photographer Brian Romeijn managed to locate and enter the train to make some photos that’ll take you back in time.

Brian started with photography in 2009 after ‘something terrible’ happened to him. He fled to Rotterdam, where he found his home. During a course on photography his teacher told him something about photographing abandoned places and that was the moment he started his urban exploration adventure.

On his website he says: “The idea of walking around in buildings which were abandoned for various reasons fascinates me. What happened here and why has it been abandoned? What’s the story behind the abandonment and can I find historical facts of these places on the internet? When I step into an abandoned site it feels like stepping into a time machine. I try to feel the emotion of its past and that is what I want to show in my pictures. When people are looking at my work and raise a question about the “what, why, when” then I feel I have succeeded.”

He’s found and visited a lot of great abandoned urban sites since. As said above, one of them is the Orient Express train. The passenger train service was created in 1883 by Compagnie Internationale des Wagons-Lits (CIWL) and became synonymous with luxury travel. In 1977 the express stopped serving Istanbul. After several route changes in the years after, the Orient Express finally stopped completely on December 14th 2009 as a ‘victim of high-speed trains and cut-rate airlines’. The remains can now, thanks to Brian, been seen on his stunning photos. Check it out.

See more of Brian’s photo’s on his website.


Photos with courtesy of Brian Romeijn
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